KPFA: Up Front [Program Feed]


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  • Myanmar: Bride trafficking growing, as China faces women shortage; Plus: The Goddess Experience opens in SF promising Afrobeats, dance, fashion, spirituality and culture
    0:08 – China’s one-child policy and sex selective abortions have left the country with too few women to produce heirs, so Chinese families are trafficking in brides from Myanmar. We speak with Heather Barr (@heatherbarr1 [1]) a senior researcher with Human Rights Watch, on her latest piece “You Should Be Worrying About the Woman Shortage. [2]” 1:34 – In honor of Women’s History Month, D’Wayne Wiggins (@DWayneWiggins [3]) presents The Goddess Experience [4] featuring Sistah Iminah, Friday, March 29th at 8 pm at the Fillmore Heritage Center in San Francisco. We speak with the Grammy-award winning artist and founding member of the group Tony Toni Tone and Sistah Iminah (@Ghetto2Goddess [5]) singer, songwriter, educator and Ifa priestess, about their upcoming collaborative project. [1] https://twitter.com/heatherbarr1 [2] https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/04/you-should-be-worrying-about-woman-shortage [3] https://twitter.com/DWayneWiggins [4] https://www.facebook.com/DwayneWigginsFanPage/posts/2315760261788269 [5] https://twitter.com/Ghetto2Goddess
  • Second jury rules against Monsanto, liable for Roundup causing cancer; Plus: the 5th Annual Walk for Justice to bring together families of victims of police violent from all over California
    0:08 – Cyclone Idai wreaks havoc in southern Africa, hundreds dead and displaced in Mozambique We speak with Dr Isaias Ramo, Mozambique Country Director for Health Alliance International [1]; he’s based in the capital, Maputo. Then, we’re joined by Kerry Emmanuel, professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT discuss the impact of climate change and how these catastrophic storms have increased in intensity and precipitation. 0:34 – The second jury has come down in another landmark case against Monsanto, finding Roundup liable for a second man’s cancer. Now, there are thousands of cases to follow. We speak with Carey Gillam (@careygillam [2]), investigative journalist and research Director for the non-profit, US Right to Know. She’s written extensively on chemical pollution, corruption, and Monsanto. Her latest book is Whitewash: The Story of Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science. 1:55 – KPFA News: In a statement released this week,  the ruling Hamas party in Gaza, expressed sorrow for the harm that many people have been subject to, during recent popular protests, across Gaza.  The protests were met by Hamas’s violent responses, in the streets of Gaza, leading to arrest of dozens of people, including journalists. Pacifica’s Rami Almeghari has more. 1:08 – What kind of training do Police Departments do for mental health calls? What could the alternatives be? We speak with Amy Watson, a professor at Jane Addams College of Social Work at University of Illinois at Chicago, who studies crisis intervention teams. 1:34 – This weekend there will be a series of events in Oakland to honor the legacy of Oscar Grant, including community events, services, and the 10th Annual Oscar Grant Foundation Gala. We speak with Wanda Johnson, the mother of Oscar Grant, who was killed by BART police in 2009. She is Executive Director of the Oscar Grant Foundation.  [3] 1:45 – This weekend also marks the 5th Annual Walk for Justice [4], bringing together families and supporters from ar …
  • Tasers under scrutiny in San Mateo County, after no charges or changes since death of Chinedu Okobi; Plus: SCOTUS rules indefinite detention of immigrants lawful
    0:08 – Tasers in San Mateo and the death of Chinedu Okobi five months later Ebele Okobi is the sister of Chinedu Okobi, who died on October 3, 2018, after San Mateo County Sherriff’s deputies repeatedly tased him. Kate Amoo-Gottfried and Regina Islas are with the Justice4Chinedu Coalition, organizing to demand justice for Chinedu Okobi, a 39-year-old black man killed by police in Millbrae on October 3, 2018. He was the third person killed after being shocked with a Taser by law enforcement officers in San Mateo County last year. 0:34 – There is no government agency that counts taser deaths at the hands of law enforcement. Luckily, an investigative team at Reuters did. They spent months combing through legal and news databases to run down every case where police tased someone who died shortly after. We speak with the lead reporter on that project, Peter Eisler (@byPeterEisler [1]), National Affairs Correspondent with Reuters. 0:56 – Theater Review: KPFA’s Richard Wolinsky reviews The Who and the What, by Pulitzer-Prize winning playwright Ayad Akhtar, about conflicting values in the Muslim World. It runs at Marin Theater company through Sunday March 24 1:08 – MUNI Union Trusteed, national union takes over Muni local in midst of contract talks We speak with Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez (@FitzTheReporter) [2], transportation reporter and columnist for the San Francisco Examiner. 1:20 – UC Workers go on 1 day strike We speak with Liz Perlman, Executive Director of AFSCME Local 3299, which is going out on strike in solidarity with UPTE-CWA 9919. UPTE-CWA 9119 and AFSCME Local 3299 represent more than 39,000 Research, Technical Healthcare, Service, and Patient Care workers at the University of California’s 10 campuses, 5 medical centers, numerous clinics, research laboratories, and UC Hastings College of Law. 1:34 – BREAKING: Supreme Court Green-Lights Indefinite Detention for Immigrants We speak with Mark Joseph Stern (@mjs_DC [3]) covers courts and the law for Slate. 1:45 – …
  • Tommy Orange on debut novel ‘There There;’ Plus: Four months since the killing of Augustin ‘Augie’ Gonsalez by Hayward Police, the family is still looking for answers
    0:08 – Anchor Brewing becomes the first craft brewery in US to unionize Brace Beldon works on the keg-line at Anchor Brewing, and was one of the organizers in the unionizing effort. 0:34 – Tommy Orange is the author of the bestselling new novel about the lives of native american in Oakland, There There. [1] Today, PEN American announced Tommy Orange is the winner of the prestigious PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel [2] – congratulations! 1:08 – On November 15, 2018 Agustin “Augie” Gonsalez was outside a home of an acquaintance in Hayward when he was involved in an altercation, where the Hayward Police were called. The caller claimed there was a man with a knife. Police arrived and within seven seconds, as seen in public police body camera footage, they shot him dead. Gonsalez was a 29 year old father of two, and a local resident of Hayward. We’re joined by Kristina Gonsalez and Alexander (Alex) Moreno, cousins of Augie Gonzalez, and Rebecca Ruiz is an organizer based in Hayward. The Hayward Police and the Hayward Mayor’s Office declined to comment for this segment, citing the case as under open investigation. The Police Chief released a Critical Incident video [3] on Feb 1 2019, with a audio and video, including the 911 dispatcher call and police body camera footage of the shooting. Hayward Police say the two officers involved – Phillip Wooley and Michael Clark – were put on paid administrative leave.There are several simultaneous investigations, conducted by the District Attorney’s Office, the Hayward Police Department Criminal Investigations Bureau and one internal investigation by the Hayward Internal Affairs unit. They did not say when these investigations would be completed. The family and supporters will be rallying today, March 19 at 6pm ahead of the Hayward City Council meeting to demand justice for Augie’s death. 1:34 – Yesterday, Monday March 18 marks the one year anniversary of the killing of Stephon Clark by Sacramento PD. The weekend was marked by var …
  • White Supremacy and the Terror Attack in Christchurch; Plus: A round table and listener calls on the college fraud scandal
    0:08 Mondays with Mitch Mitch Jeserich, host of Letters & Politics, jumps into the studio with Cat and Brian to discuss the weekend’s headlines. Hear about the murder of 50 Muslims at prayer in Christchurch, New Zealand, the Senate’s vote against Trump’s emergency declaration, and more. 0:34 – After the Massacre After 50 Muslims were murdered by a white supremacist/nationalist while at weekly prayer, Muslims around the world have been grieving together. With us to discuss the communal mourning, and what we do next, is Zahra Billoo (@ZahraBilloo [1]), attorney and the Executive Director of the Bay Area chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. 1:08 – College Admissions Scandal The complicated and often nebulous college admissions process has been under increased scrutiny lately, after dozens of wealthy parents were revealed to have bribed and conned college officials to get their children into elite colleges. However, the playing field has always been uneven when it comes to the college admissions process, especially for working-class, first-generation, and students of color. With us to discuss the deep structural inequality in America’s education system are: James Burch, the policy director of the Anti-Police Terror Project, a former SAT/ACT tutor, and a graduate of Georgetown Law and Yale; Scott Jaschik (@ScottJaschik), the editor of Inside Higher Ed; and Natasha Warikoo (@nkwarikoo [2]), Associate Professor of Education at Harvard University and author of “The Diversity Bargain: And Other Dilemmas of Race, Admissions, and Meritocracy at Elite Universities.” [1] http://www.twitter.com/zahrabilloo [2] https://twitter.com/nkwarikoo
  • Youth vs. the Apocalypse organizing set to strike around the world; Plus: Combating rape and violence in the Congo with Patricia Servant
    0:08 – Today hundreds of strikes are planned in at least 75 countries around the world. Hundreds of students around the Bay Area are walking out of classes in solidarity and protest in what they are calling environmental neglect. We speak with activists with Youth vs. The Apocalypse (@Y_Vs_A [1]), 7th grader Samantha and 11th grader Isha. 0:34 – The Democratic Republic of Congo has been called the “rape capital of the world.” This rise in sexual violence came on the heels of the First and Second Congo wars up to the newly held historic presidential elections where Felix Tshisekedi was named the winner to the surprise and dismay of many. For more on violence against women in the Congo we speak with Patricia Servant, Founder of Congo Love and radio host of CongoLive! About violence against women in the Congo as well as community organization, resilience and hope. [1] https://twitter.com/Y_Vs_A
  • A former ACT faculty sues the SF theater company for racial discrimination; Plus: the Black Desi Secret History Project
    0:08 – Stephen Buescher is a choreographer and drama instructor. Last month, he filed a lawsuit against the American Conservatory Theater (ACT) for racial discrimination and harassment. He worked at the Conservatory for ten years and faced racism and discrimination from the leadership and his colleagues that ultimately forced him to resign. Felicia Medina is a civil rights attorney with the law firm Medina Orthwein LLP. They specialize in employment discrimination, sexual harassment, whistleblower protections, wage and hour, Title IX and civil rights for prisoners. 0:34 – Jerrie Johnson is a student with the ACT theater, studying drama, and shares her experience of being a black women at ACT Theater.  0:51 – David Reiner is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of ACT Theater, and discusses the their response to the lawsuit and what reforms they have underway. 1:08 – KPFA News: Israel snipers have killed and injured thousands of Palestinian in clashes with Hamas in the Gaza Strip in the past decade. Many of those who have lost limbs have been unable to return to work. Rami Almeghari reports from Gaza on a Red Cross program providing small grants to Palestinians disabled by war to set up their own businesses. 1:15 – The Black Desi Secret History Project [1] unravels a history of solidarity between Black America and South Asia, a history that’s largely unknown and has not been taught in schools. The curator of the project is South Asian Bay Area activist Anirvan Chatarjee who with his partner Barnali Ghosh are also the curators of Berkeley’s South Asian Radical History Walking Tour [2]. A 2-miles walking tour (that’s wheelchair/stroller accessible) in the streets of Berkeley. It uses storytelling and street theater to narrate 100 years of South Asian presence and radical activism in the city. KPFA’s reporter Mira Nabulsi joined one of those walking tours and talked to Anirvan and Barnali to learn more about their work. 1:34 – Roger McNamee is an investor, venture capital …
  • Gov Newsom moves to end the death penalty in CA; Plus: What you need to know about Trump’s domestic “gag rule” and attacks on abortion services
    0:08 – US withdraws diplomats from Venezuela, power outages, and political crisis deepens David Smilde is a professor of sociology at Tulane University, where he is the Charles A. and Leo M. Favrot Professor of Human Relations. He has researched Venezuela for over 25 years, and lived and taught in Venezuela for 14 years. He’s published several books, and is also a senior fellow at the Washington Office of Latin America,(WOLA) specializing in Venezuela. 0:40 – Ahmed Abu Artema is a Palestinian journalist and peace activist. He is the author of the book “Organized Chaos” and numerous articles and one of the founders of the Great Return March. He is a refugee from Al Ramla village in Palestine, and visited KPFA studios as part of a US tour with the American Friends Services Committee. 1:08 – Last May, the Trump Administration announced a change to Title X critics say is a domestic “gag rule” [1] which effectively bans family planning providers from referring patients for abortion care and forces them to physically separate abortion services from Title X services. The move is an apparent attempt to make good on Trump’s campaign promise [2] to defund Planned Parenthood. We’re joined by Jessica Mason Pieklo, vice president of law and the courts for Rewire.News (Rewire DOT news) where she oversees legal reporting and analysis and is the co-host of Rewire.News’ podcast Boom! Lawyered, to discuss their reporting – “What You Need to Know About Trump’s Attacks on the Federal Family Planning Program.” [3] 1:34 – Breaking: CA Governor Gavin Newsom announces end of the death penalty Ellen Kreitzberg is a Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Social Justice and Public Service at Santa Clara University School of Law. John Raphling is a senior researcher on criminal justice with Human Rights Watch.   [1] https://rewire.news/article/2019/02/22/trump-administration-releases-final-text-of-domestic-gag-rule-restriction-on-title-x/ [2] https://rewire.news/article/2016/09/16/tru …
  • San Francisco’s new Public Defender, Manojar Raju: Plus: Mandatory minimum sentencing and the path to decarceration
    0:08 – San Francisco’s new Public Defender Manojar Raju was serving as the manager of the San Francisco Public Defender’s Felony Unit. On Sunday he was picked by San Francisco Mayor London Breed to take over as Public Defender until the next election. 0:34 – The challenges of mandatory minimum sentences in the path to decarceration Lara Bazelon (@larabazelon [1]) is associate professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law, where she directs the Criminal & Juvenile Justice and Racial Justice Clinics and author of  Rectify: The Power of Restorative Justice After Wrongful Conviction [2]. Keith Wattley (@UnCommLaw [3]) is the founder and Executive Director of Uncommon Law, dedicated to providing access to justice and healing for people impacted by incarceration. Event: Tonight Tuesday March 12 at 6:45 pm Uncommon Law presents HBO Special “The Sentence” [4] which explores the traumatic impact of mandatory minimum sentencing on families and communities. At the New Parkway Theater in Oakland. On a related note: KPFA is sponsoring a showing of The Defender this Sunday, March 17 at 3 pm at the New Parkway Theater in Oakland. 474 24th Street… 50% of ticket sales will go toward the Jeff Adachi Legacy Fund. 8am – Author Interview: Tim Wu (@superwuster [5]) is a law professor at Colombia University and author of The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age [1] https://twitter.com/larabazelon [2] https://larabazelon.com/book [3] https://twitter.com/UnCommLaw [4] https://www.facebook.com/events/390528881740246/ [5] https://twitter.com/superwuster
  • Debate: Emergency preparedness in Alameda County, after the end of militarized Urban Shield program; Plus: Johann Hari on Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression
    0:08 – Mondays with Mitch Mitch Jeserich, host of Letters & Politics, jumps into the studio with Cat and Brian to discuss the weekend’s headlines. Hear about Chelsea Manning’s arrest, Trump’s 2020 budget, action in Sacramento to protest Stephon Clark’s killers going uncharged, and more. 0:34 – Alameda County Sheriff’s Department fights  Board of Supervisors Reconsidering Decision to End Urban Shield Since its inception in 2007, Urban Shield has held a contested place in Alameda County politics. Some, like Sergeant Ray Kelly of the Alameda County Sheriff’s Department, call it “an exercise program that runs for about three days, usually around September each year,” and claim that it is designed to help fire, police, and ambulance services co-ordinate and better train for emergency situations. Others, like Amber Akemi Piatt (@amberakemipiatt [1]) is the Director of the Health Instead of Punishment Program at Human Impact Partners and is a member of the Stop Urban Shield Coalition, see the program as a “racist war games and weapons expo” with “Islamophobic roots.” Listen to both sides discuss ahead of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors’ meeting tomorrow at 9.30 am at 1221 Oak Street, Oakland. 1:08 – Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression — and the Unexpected Solutions From an Amish village in Indiana to a city in Brazil where advertising is banned, author of Lost Connections Johann Hari (@johannhari101 [2]) has travelled the world trying to understand the causes for anxiety and depression. What he learned turned into his most recent book, the New York Times best-selling Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression — and the Unexpected Solutions. (Urban Shield photo: Oakland Privacy PRA, Mike Katz-Lacabe) [1] https://twitter.com/amberakemipiatt [2] https://twitter.com/johannhari101
  • Winter Fund Drive Finale: The Life of Frederick Douglas and the Long Shadow
    0:08 – Fund Drive Premium: The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of a Slave’s Journey from Bondage to Freedom David F. Walker (@DavidWalker1201 [1]) is a writer, filmmaker and graphic artist. His latest book is The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of a Slave’s Journey from Bondage to Freedom. [2]Yours for a pledge [3] of $100 to KPFA, or, with the addition of the Pacifica Radio Archives Black History Collection, $300. 1:08 – Fund Drive Special: The Long Shadow Of all the divisions in America, none is as insidious and destructive as racism. In this powerful documentary, The Long Shadow [4] the filmmakers, both privileged daughters of the South, who were haunted by their families slave owning pasts, passionately seek the hidden truth and the untold stories of how America—guided by the South’s powerful political influence—steadily, deliberately and at times secretly, established white privilege in our institutions, laws, culture and economy. Film by Francis Causey, now yours for a pledge of $100 to KPFA. [5] Today is the last day of our Winter Fund Drive! Thank you, as always, for supporting community radio. You can donate online now at kpfa.org [6] or call 1-800-HEY-KPFA or 1-800-439-5732 and receive the following collections and thank you gifts. [7] [1] https://twitter.com/DavidWalker1201 [2] https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/566297/the-life-of-frederick-douglass-by-david-f-walker-art-by-damon-smyth-and-colors-by-marissa-louise/9780399581441/ [3] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/ [4] http://thelongshadowfilm.com/the-film/ [5] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/ [6] http://kpfa.org/ [7] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/
  • War with Russia? From Putin to Russiagate with Stephen Cohen and Katrina vanden Heuvel; Plus: This Immeasurable Place: Buddhist chefs use food to bridge divides and fight Trump
    0:08 – Fund Drive Premium: War with Russia? Stephen F. Cohen is Professor Emeritus of Politics at Princeton University, where for many years he was also director of the Russian Studies Program, and Professor Emeritus of Russian Studies and History at New York University. His latest book is War with Russia? From Putin & Ukraine, to Trump and Russiagate. Katrina vanden Heuvel (@KatrinaNation [1]) is Editor and Publisher of The Nation, as well as a frequent commentator on US and international politics. Cohen and vanden Heuvel are married. We air excerpts of a KPFA hosted event with Stephen Cohen & Katrina vanden Heuvel on his new book: War with Russia? From Putin & Ukraine, to Trump and Russiagate Monday Feb 25 @ First Congregational Church in Berkeley. A recording of their discussion is yours for a pledge [2] of $75 to KPFA — or, combined with the book, $175. 1:08 – Fund Drive Premium: This Immeasurable Place [3]  Blake Spalding (@blakerspalding)  [4]is a chef and co-owner of Hell’s Backbone Grill in Bolder, a Buddhist principled, farm-to-table restaurant in the heart of Mormon country in Utah. She and her partner, a co-owner Jennifer Castle are part of a lawsuit against the Trump Administration as part of their fight to preserve the Grand Escalante National Monument near their farm and restaurant in Utah. They recently published their stories in a book of food writing, recipes and essays called This Immeasurable Place. Yours for a pledge of $200 to KPFA. [5] [1] https://twitter.com/KatrinaNation [2] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/ [3] https://hellsbackbonegrill.com/ [4] https://twitter.com/blakerspalding [5] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/
  • The African-American and Latinx History of the US with historian Paul Ortiz; Plus: The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of the Slaves Journey from Bondage to Freedom
    0:08 — Fund Drive Premium: An African American and Latinx History of the United States Paul Ortiz [1] is a professor of history at the University of Florida and the Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. He’s the author of several books, including his most recent work, An African American and Latinx History of the United States [2]. Yours for a pledge [3] of $80 to KPFA, or, with the addition of the Pacifica Radio Archives Black History Collection, $250. 1:08 — Fund Drive Special: The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of a Slave’s Journey from Bondage to Freedom David F. Walker [4] is a writer, filmmaker and graphic artist. His latest book is The Life of Frederick Douglass: A Graphic Narrative of a Slave’s Journey from Bondage to Freedom. [5] Yours for a pledge [3] of $100 to KPFA, or, with the addition of the Pacifica Radio Archives Black History Collection, $300. [1] https://history.ufl.edu/directory/current-faculty/paul-ortiz/ [2] https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/554578/an-african-american-and-latinx-history-of-the-united-states-by-paul-ortiz/9780807005934 [3] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/ [4] https://twitter.com/DavidWalker1201 [5] https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/566297/the-life-of-frederick-douglass-by-david-f-walker-art-by-damon-smyth-and-colors-by-marissa-louise/9780399581441/ [6] https://secure.kpfa.org/support/
  • This Immeasurable Place: Utah chefs stand up to Trump and drilling in the Grande Staircase Monument; Plus: Women, Ritual and Ecology in India with Vandana Shiva and Vijaya Nagarajan
    0:08 – Fund Drive Premium: This Immeasurable Place [1]  Blake Spalding (@blakerspalding)  [2]is a chef and co-owner of Hell’s Backbone Grill in Bolder, a Buddhist principled, farm-to-table restaurant in the heart of Mormon country in Utah. She and her partner, a co-owner Jennifer Castle are part of a lawsuit against the Trump Administration as part of their fight to preserve the Grand Escalante National Monument near their farm and restaurant in Utah. They recently published their stories in a book of food writing, recipes and essays called This Immeasurable Place. Yours for a pledge of $200 to KPFA. [3] 1:08 – Fund Drive Premium: Feeding A Thousand Souls Every day millions of Tamil women in southeast India wake up before dawn to create the kōlam, a ritual design made of rice flour, on the thresholds of homes. This thousand year-old ritual welcomes and honors the goddesses Lakshmi and Bhudevi. Propelled by a lifelong interest and deeply informed research, Nagarajan provides a poetic and surprising entry into the layered complexities of Hindu culture. Braiding Tamil women’s voices and the author’s own stories, Feeding a Thousand Souls offers different knowledge traditions––beauty, history, gender, literature, religion, anthropology, mathematics, and ecology. Today we air excerpts of a special KPFA event featuring: Vandana Shiva (@drvandanashiva [4]) is an scholar, activist, author of more than twenty books, and one of the luminaries of the alter-globalization movement, and Vijaya Nagarajan is a Professor of Religious Studies at the University of San Francisco. Author of Feeding A Thousand Souls: Women, Ritual, and Ecology in India – An Exploration of the Kolam.  They appeared in Berkeley on Monday Feb 11, 2019 at the First Congregational Church as part of a KPFA Benefit. KPFA’s Winter Fund Drive is here! Thank you, as always, for supporting community radio. You can donate online now at kpfa.org [5] or call 1-800-HEY-KPFA or 1-800-439-5732 and receive the following co …
  • Oakland teachers strike a tentative deal with OUSD; Plus: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It?
    0:08 – Breaking News: Oakland teachers vote to approve an agreement to end an 8 day strike Kitty Kelly Epstein is an educator, scholar, and author of A Different View of Urban Schools: Civil Rights, Critical Race Theory, and Unexplored Realities. She also host of KPFA’s “Education Today” airing each 2nd and 4th Friday at 2:30pm. 0:25 – Fund Drive Premium: Fandango at the Wall Fandango at the Wall: Creating Harmony Between the United States and Mexico [1], is a experiential project by GRAMMY-winning producer and New York Times bestselling author, Kabir Sehgal, accompanied by a score from GRAMMY-winning musician Arturo O’Farrill and a foreword written and read by historian Douglas Brinkley. Through periods of great friendship with robust trade and loose immigration policies to tense relations beset by wars, the drug trade and human trafficking the relationship between the United States and Mexico has had its ups and downs. With the latest Trump-induced xenophobia toward Mexico, Fandango contextualizes how it is the latest swing in the up-and-down, two-hundred-year history of these two countries. We speak with Kabir Seghal (@HiKabir [2]), a five time Grammy and Latin Grammy award-winning producer, author, and currently works as a corporate strategist with a global payments technology investment firm. His latest project is Fandango at the Wall: Creating Harmony Between the United States and Mexico. Get the Fandango soundtrack [3] (2 CDs) for your pledge of $100, or the box set (book + CD) for $150, or both for $200. 1:08 – Fund Drive Premium: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It?  Eric Holt-Gimenez  is the director of the Institute for Food and Development Policy, known as Food First, a “people’s think tank” dedicated to ending the injustices that cause hunger. He’s the author of Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? And A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism. Yours for a pledge of $100, and $150 to KPFA. Cover Photo by Nick Alexandra for KPFA News [1] http://fand …

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